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A Lamborghini Miura, cocaine and broken bones: the surreal story of the crash of miles Davis and Jim Glickenhaus
3 years ago

A Lamborghini Miura, cocaine and broken bones: the surreal story of the crash of miles Davis and Jim Glickenhaus

What the hell has that to do James Glickenhaus – film director and famous builder of supercars competition – with the trumpet player and jazz star miles Davis? A lot more than you think. Mr. Glickenhaus saved the life of a miles Davis absolutely positioned, after having had a terrible accident with his Lamborghini Miura and recently premiered, in the distant year of 1972. A history surreal that the own James Glickenhaus recounted some time ago on the official website of Scuderia Cameron Glickenhaus. There is No waste.

miles Davis was not a saint: it is rumored that he enjoyed losing to the cops who were pursuing them in their brand new Miura.

it Happened one evening of the year 1972 in New York. miles Davis was on the point of losing life in a car accident. The star of jazz african-american – known for his wonderful “Kind of Blue”, among other recordings – driving at a speed very excessive by the West Side Highway of New York. A motorway of three lanes, which runs parallel to the Hudson river in New York. Miles Davis was fighting to control the almost 400 HP of fury of his Miura, under the effect of drugs, giving lurching between rain and plenty of traffic.

At the height of 125th street, Davis crossed three lanes in a reckless manner, trying to perform a rotation of 90 degrees to about 100 km/h, possibly after losing the notion of space and warn that he should leave the highway immediately. The drugs, the firm and the speed they played against, crashing his Lamborghini Miura against the median cement. The accident was brutal, and in the words of Glickenhaus – a witness to the accident – the car exploded into thousands of pieces as if it were a wooden raft.

After the accident, and a see his legs, recovered, miles Davis commissioned another Lamborghini Miura identical.

Davis was lucky that it was James Glickenhaus the first to assist you. A lot of luck. When James went to help him, he found a scene out of dante’s inferno: several of the bones broke through the leather trousers of Davis, the first thing he did was ask you if your car was well. Davis was everything a petrolhead, but I didn’t know to use with head up their toys, unfortunately. “No, your car is wrecked,“ he said Glickenhaus, just before noting two large bags of white powder on the passenger seat.

were Not precisely of flour, not. With a shirt, Glickenhaus made a tourniquet on his legs, and then threw the bags through an open sewer. “What the f*** are you doing?” yelled Davis, which was not yet aware of the gravity of the situation. The same rain that contributed to the accident helped Glickenhaus to clean up the remains of cocaine that he had on the floor of the Miura. The police arrived shortly, ordering all the curious and the Glickenhaus to leave the scene of the accident.

in Addition to prevent to die to bleed to death, James Glickenhaus avoided a trip – possibly only one-way – Davis to the jail. Years later, Glickenhaus was shooting “Shakedown” with Peter Weller. Glickenhaus told the story to Weller, a friend of Davis. In the backstage of a concert, Weller asked the musician if the story was true. It was. “I’ve Always wondered who it was that bastard white“, replied Davis. A curious anecdote, which links the excesses of fame and the music to this our world of the car.

Source: Jalopnik
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